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Knit Like Crazy Lesson 3

LESSON #3 MAKE IT FIT

 

 

Click on the pictures to see enlarged view

 

Lessons 1 Lesson 2 Lesson 3 Lesson 4

Lesson 5 Lesson 6 Lesson 7 Lesson 8

Lesson 9 Lesson 10 Lesson 11 Lesson 12

 

 

OBJECTIVE:
understand structure of stitch
using different yarns together
cast on, decrease, increase
gain freedom of choices

   


LEARN TO LOVE TO MAKE SAMPLES.....SEE WHY
MOST IMPORTANT THING IN KNITTING IS GAUGE
Make a collection of yarns, at least five colors. Get used to knitting with lots of different yarns. Cut the yarn in two yard lengths and have them hanging by your knitting area so you can just grab the color you want. We used to use a lot of little bobbins but a two yard length of yarn is easier to untangle, just pull it thru if things get crazy.
CAST ON 20 STITCHES AND KNIT USING ALL THE DIFFERENT YARNS IN YOUR COLLECTION. YOU CAN USE AS LITTLE OR AS MUCH OF EACH COLOR YOU HAVE BUT USE ALL THE COLORS. KNIT SQUARES, STRIPES, CIRCLES, FLOWERS A DESIGN.........ANYTHING YOU WANT. When you change colors across the row remember to cross one thread over the other thread so you wont have holes later.
How much yarn for one row? How wide will the garment be? You will need three times this length. If you want to know how much for a bind off then you need four times. Don't forget just a little bit more for the tail end.
   
         
         
         
   


Measure your body then you can determine how many stitches.
NOW LET'S TALK ABOUT STRUCTURE:
GAUGE = X NUMBER INCHES = NUMBER STS
NORMAL FIT + 10% (36 BUST PLUS 3")
LOOSE FIT + 15% (36 BUST PLUS 5-6" MORE)
OVERSIZE FIT + 20% OR 30% (36" BUST PLUS 8-11" MORE)
In long sweater to cover hips it is better to use largest measurement (hip) and go straight up. AFTER YOU HAVE MADE YOUR GAUGE AND AFTER YOU HAVE MEASURED YOUR BODY and you know what you want--such as a big cardigan, shell, giant top, whatever the style--then you can make your pattern.
1. Idea first--if your idea came from the yarn you want to use then: think about how you think it would be best to shape this garment. Maybe this yarn is thin and you want a formal shell with a lace pattern or maybe it's thick and you want a big coat with lots of pattern. That's a big difference in how you want to use the yarn
2. Use the yarn or yarns and make a swatch to determine gauge
change your needle sizes to see if you like it different gauges. It might be a big surprise to use large needles on thin yarn, etc. If you are using yarns that have a big difference in thickness then usually use the needle size to accommodate the thinner yarn and let the thick one adjust to it.
3. Design might come first then find the yarns to make it
think about how you want to look in this garment and when you will be wearing it, like summer or winter, or how practical, like angora, silk or cotton or wool. Sometimes it's thrilling to make a formal idea with informal yarns or vice-versa. Like wearing denim to a dance.
4. Graph out your garment shape either using plain paper or the real thing if it matches your stitch gauge....otherwise just plain paper will be less confusing. You can even use newspaper with black or color pen (whatever that allows you to see your design instead of the newsprint) You can even use a dressmaker's pattern and just measure inches and compute how many stitches you need wherever it changes shape. You can even make a "cartoon" - a life-sized plan used by tapestry weavers. This provides a guide to your progress while you are knitting. A cartoon is a great idea if you have a complicated color change design and know exactly what you want. While you are knitting just lay your work on the cartoon and see how you are doing. Be curious all the time. A small drawing on your attached information card is easier to carry around as a reminder of what you are knitting. Sometimes your design will change drastically if you use different size stitches--round circles in the design might become long oblongs and squares might become rectangles as you change the size of the stitch and row. So you need to know just exactly what you want before you begin unless you are puddling yarns or Chinese menu or any other tweeding effect by changing yarns at random instead of a definite pattern.

5. Increases or decreases are determined by your gauge too
INCREASES


DECREASES

SLEEVE SHAPE
If your sleeve is long (you know how long you want it) and if your sleeve is smaller at the wrist than at the armhole then you will have to make increases or decreases depending where you start knitting your sleeve. If you start at the wrist then you will increase to your armhole. You have determined the amount of stitches at your wrist and you know how many stitches at your armhole so subtract the wrist from the armhole and you know how long this sleeve will be and you know how many rows it will take to knit it so you know how many rows you have to increase your stitches. for instance your gauge is 5 stitches to the inch and you have 6 rows to each inch. You want a 6 inch wrist so you need 30 stitches (5 stitches make an inch times the amount of inches you want) and at your armhole your sleeve needs to measure 24 inches so you will need 120 stitches there.(5 times 24 = 120) Your sleeve is 15 inches long so you have to work 90 rows in order to make this sleeve (15 inches long times 6 rows to the inch) Remember 30 stitches at wrist and 120 ar armhole so your formula for this garment is 30 from 120 =90stitches you need to increase in order to make your sleeve and you have 90 rows to do it (15 inches times 6 rows to the inch = 90) Now you have a lot of choices. You need 90 stitches and you have 90 rows to do it so just increase one stitch at beginning of every row-------or if you want roomier sleeve at wrist then increase 10 stitches evenly over first row and then increase first and last stitch every other row for next 80 rows and knit evenly last 10 rows. This is endless and you are the designer so do what you want to do but remember you said you need 30 stitches = 6inches at your wrist and 120 stitches=24 inches at your armhole so work within those confines and you will be successful no matter what happens in between. You might want ruffles, popcorns, cables, bubbles, short rows, slits, holes or whatever in between.


YOUR BODY SHAPE IS THE SAME DIFFERENCE AS THE SLEEVE IDEA YOU KNOW WHAT SHAPE
you want and what size so just use your gauge and multiply stitch times inches and rows times inches and you will be surprised at just how easy it is.





BE CURIOUS ALL THE TIME, DON'T WAIT

 

SUGGESTIONS FOR EDGE STITCHES:
GARTER STS SELVEDGE- always knit first sts. This makes an even edge and may be easier to put sides together later.
KNIT ENDS-Begin and end every seam edge with a k1 (knit on right side might be purl on wrong side if pattern is used) and when you sew the pieces together from the right side, go into the center of each knit stitch on the seam edge. One half of each knit stitch will disappear to the inside and one half will make up a single knit stitch at the invisible seam.
First and second stitch, tug yarn so you won't have big loops at end.

Edges you do later:
Crochet
Pick up all stitches around the edge. Next row bind off. Or knit one row and then bind off.
Rolled work with needle two sizes smaller than the one used for stockinette until depth of roll is achieved. Bind off with a larger needle.

 

Simple edges: sometimes you need to do an edge while you are knitting the garment and sometimes you can do it when you have finished each section but you do need to know what you want !!

 

Bound Pick up stitches evenly, work in stockinette stitch until desired depth then purl one row on the knit side or knit one row on the purl side for the turn then work the same number of rows as before. Fold this in half and sew the stitches to the base of picked-up row. If this edge is worked around a curve then decreases should be made on either side of the shoulder markers up to the hemline row then the increases are made in the same way to end of band.
Picot Same as bound except the purl one row on the knit side is *yarn over, knit two together* across this row then next row purl for stockinette continuation.
Bias Use smaller size needles. Cast on number of stitches needed for the width of the border. Work in stockinette stitch or k1,p1 rib, increase 1 stitch at the beginning of each right side row while decreasing 1 stitch at the end of the same row. Do this until the length is achieved. Stitch this in place from wrong side. Make sure that you sew into the same stitch of the main piece on every row.
Rib edge is always good Rib with cables in it is less elastic.
Ribbing always pick up with yarn on needle in right hand, Don't create short rows.
CASTING OFF DIFFERENT COLORS: Knit the stitch immediately prior to the color change in the next color. When the stitch is slipped over the top it sits over the next color block and is correct.

 


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